By November 12, 2011

Eat Right 4 Your Type

The “Eat Right 4 Your Type” Diet is a method of eating wherein adherents eat or avoid certain foods based on their blood types. It was designed by Dr. D’Adamo, a naturopathic physician who believes that blood type significantly affects a person’s ability to properly digest different foods. Although it is not currently backed by any large medical groups, but there are many followers who believe in its benefits.

What you can and can’t eat on the diet is completely governed by your blood type. Type “O” dieters follow a protein-rich diet like that of humanity’s hunter-gatherer ancestors, as the O blood type was the earliest to evolve in human history. Type A dieters are “agrarian,” best suited for a vegetarianism. Type B are most like ancient nomads, with a lot of flexibility in their diets, while AB is the most recently-evolved blood type and has a fairly sensitive digestive system.

According to the diet, type-O dieters will benefit most from lean meats like poultry and fish. They should avoid excessive intake of grains, however, and engage in regular and vigorous exercise. Type-A diets should be high in soy, organic vegetables, and whole grains, with gentle exercising. Type-B dieters, like type-O, should avoid grains and starches, but will do well with low-fat diary, lean meats, fresh produce, and moderate exercise. AB diets will do well with gentle exercising, seafood, tofu, dairy, and vegetables, but should avoid red meat and poultry.

The concept behind the diet is that all foods contain lectins, proteins each blood type digests differently. Different blood types will have certain native lectins that may not be compatible with all foods, so you should avoid those particular foods. Food lectins that aren’t compatible with your blood type will act like a poison in your body, causing food-related conditions like diabetes and heart disease, along with a host of other illnesses.

The American Dietetic Association, however, does not support the diet, and there have been no major studies put forward to duplicate D’Adamo’s claimed results. Most experts agree that it is too restrictive to work on a wide basis, cutting out certain food groups completely and putting some at risk for nutritional deficiencies. Many dieters, however, claim to have benefited greatly from adhering to the blood type diet.

There are some advantages to the diet, however, mainly in that it encourages eating natural foods rather than those that have been refined or processed. It also does not involve calorie-counting, a drawback for the vast majority of dieters. The disadvantages are that the diet does not take into account personal preferences, allergies, or medical conditions that may affect eating habits.

Overall, however, adherents can lose diet on the weight, as long as those who continue to eat meat do so in moderation and avoid fatty cuts. Cutting out refined foods, sodium, and starches can help regulate some digestive systems, as well. This diet shares some philosophy with the evolution-based Paleolithic Diet, and although neither is very widely supported in the medical community, adherents do claim that these are diets that work well.